Cosy Stripe Blanket

This pattern uses only one crochet stitch – Cosy Stripe Blanket (this is called Double Crochet in the USA). It’s an incredibly simple but very effective mixed track using two crochet lines for each color. Simplicity (very little reading or reading pattern!) Makes it an extremely nice design, and is especially suited for the cooler months of the year, when you can snuggle up and enjoy the warmth of the blanket on your lap while you work. . The lines grow satisfactorily quickly, and the simple mixing of dots creates a beautiful surface texture.

Before we begin, it is important to know:

I used 15 x 100g of balls of Stylecraft Special DK worked on a 4mm hook to make my Cozy Stripe Blanket.

  • These 15 balls are enough to make a single bed blanket with a final size of approximately 4 feet x 6 feet / 120 cm x 180 cm.
  • If you crochet loosely, you need to make sure that your starting current and first row measures approximately 120cm, you design yourself of more than 15x100g of balls. It has a good amplitude of its current to the fulfillment of the correct size, only once the starting current a multiple of 3.
  • If you wish to make the largest or smallest, be one for a double / king size bed, you can increase the number of points in your starting string ….. an input string should be a little multiple of 3. You can also buy more.

PatternUK: Wrap the cord, insert the hook, thread the cord, loop the loop back into the stitch (three loops without a hook), thread the cord through two loops without a hook (double coat), pull and pull through of the following two loops (note: this is equivalent to the US point of dc).

To make a blanket with a width of 120 cm (single bed size) chain 198 to start.

LETS GO:

:: LINE 1 ::

1 on the fourth chain of the hook (as shown in the image above). Work 1 trio in each chain along. Assuming we’re counting the spin current as a point, you should have 196 points in total.

Chain 3 and turn.

:: LINE 2 ::

NOTE: While working a crochet treble line, you should ignore the point at the base of the chain-3. Your first sharp should go to the next point, as shown by the arrow in the picture above.

1 treble work at each point along your last point should be worked at the top of the string-3 from the previous line, as shown by the arrow below. You can easily miss this last point, so be smart!

So come on, last treble completed. Assuming we are counting the first ch-3 as a point, you should have 196 points in total.

Now, hold on, leaving a final 15cm to darn later.

:: ROW 3 :: 

NOTE: change colour for this row, and on every alternate row which will always be an odd number row. Insert your hook into the first stitch (shown above) and pull a loop of your new colour through to the front.

Chain 3 (counts as 1 treble), then 1 treble into the same stitch (as shown above).

Skip two stitches, then work 3 trebles into the next stitch (as shown above).

*Skip 2 stitches, work 3 trebles into next stitch*

Repeat between ** all the way along the row until you have 3 stitches remaining.

Skip 2 stitches, then work 2 trebles into the very last stitch (which is the top of the chain-3 from the previous row). If you want to check your stitch count for this row, you should have the following : (2 tr) + (3 tr x 64) + (2 tr)

Chain 3 and turn.

: ROW 4 ::

NOTE: you’ll be working out of the spaces between the groups of 3-trebles in this row.

Work 3 trebles into the first space (as shown above)

Work 3 trebles into each space along.

Work 1 treble into the top of the very last stitch, then fasten off leaving a 15cm tail end for darning in later. If you want to check your stitch count for this row, you should have the following :

(1 tr) + (3 tr x 65) + (1 tr)

:: ROW 5 ::

NOTE: change colour. Insert your hook into the first stitch (shown above) and pull a loop of your new colour through to the front.

Chain 3 (counts as 1 treble).

Work 1 treble into each stitch along, until there is just one stitch remaining.

IMPORTANT:

SKIP THIS LAST STITCH!! Unlike previous rows, there is NO treble worked into this last stitch. Just ignore it 🙂

Counting your beginning ch-3 as a stitch, you should have 196 stitches in total for this row.

Chain 3 and turn.

:: ROW 6 ::

NOTE: remember to ignore the stitch at the base of the chain-3. Your first treble should go into the next stitch along, as shown by the arrow in the picture above.

Work 1 treble into each stitch along.

As with row 2, make sure you don’t miss that very last stitch – work the last treble into the top of the chain-3 from the previous row.

You should have 196 stitches in this row. Fasten off, leaving a 15cm tail end to darn in later.

:: ROW 7 ::

NOTE: change colour for this row.

Insert your hook into the first stitch and pull a loop of your new colour through to the front. Chain 3 (counts as 1 treble), then work 1 treble into the same stitch.

*Skip 2 stitches, then work 3 trebles into the next stitch*

Repeat between ** until 3 stitches remain. Work 2 trebles into the very last stitch (which is the top of the chain-3 from the previous row). Turn (do not fasten off).

:: ROW 8 ::

NOTE: you’ll be working out of the spaces between the groups of trebles for this row.

Chain 3 (counts as 1 treble), then work 3 trebles into the first space. Work 3 trebles into each space along. Work 1 treble into the top of the very last stitch. Fasten off, leaving a 15cm tail end to darn in later.

:: ROW 9 ::

NOTE: change colour

Insert your hook into the first stitch (shown above) and pull a loop of your new colour through to the front. Chain 3 (counts as 1 treble). Work 1 treble into each stitch along, until there is just one stitch remaining….

REMEMBER?! That’s right, SKIP THE LAST STITCH!!

Turn (do not fasten off).

:: ROW 10 ::

NOTE: ignore the stitch at the base of the chain-3

Chain 3 (counts as 1 tr), then work 1 treble into each stitch across (don’t forget the last stitch is worked into the top of the chain-3 from the previous row).

Fasten off, leaving a 15cm tail end to darn in later.

After Row 10, you should be able to see how the simple mixed stripe pattern is forming. Each colour is used to crochet one stripe, which is made up of two rows. There is one stripe (two rows) of plain trebles, followed by one stripe (two rows) of treble clusters (groups of 3 trebles worked into one stitch).

ROW 11 = Repeat Row 7 (1st treble cluster row) ROW 12 = Repeat Row 8 (2nd treble cluster row)ROW 13 = Repeat Row 9 (1st plain treble row)**ROW 14 = Repeat Row 10 (2nd plain treble row)

NOTE: it’s very important to remember that the first plain treble row SKIPS A STITCH at the END of that row. This keeps the stitch count correct and the edges straight (there should always be 196 stitches in each of the straight tr rows)

It’s very straightforward I promise you, so long as you start and end each row correctly.

A little note about darning in those pesky ends. I’ve found the neatest way to do this is to use a darning needle and weave the end vertically up the actual post of a treble stitch.

Then weave it down the post of an adjoining treble stitch before taking it across to the outside edge. Dealing with your ends this way may seem fiddly, but if you do it as you go along (Listen to Lucy here, be disciplined with your tail ends!!), it’s not so bad and it makes a strong, super-neat finish.

You may find your edges look a little bumpy or uneven, but remember we’ll be adding a border at the end which will disguise any lumps and bumps rather nicely.

You can work this Cosy Stripe blanket using whichever colours make your heart sing. All you need to think about is the quantity – it takes roughly 15 x 100g balls to make a single bed size blanket, and twice as many to make a full king size bed blanket.

Get to know the incredible pattern too: French Market Bag

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